Leo Burnett tearing out creativity in print media at the Dubai Lynx 2013 with a grand prix with a 13 year old cliche

images-4

As clearly evident by these examples (and others offcourse)  ”The region is ripping off world class creative” and most of the time getting away with it, or so they wish ;)

nyfa_jury_10

Source: Executive Jury

Screen Shot 2013-03-20 at 4.17.24 AM

BREAK-FREE PINT CAMPAIGN – ALIEN 3

Screen Shot 2013-03-20 at 4.19.05 AM

BREAK-FREE PINT CAMPAIGN – MATRIX

Screen Shot 2013-03-20 at 4.23.46 AM

BREAK-FREE PRINT CAMPAIGN – SCARY MOVIE 4

Client FOX INTERNATIONAL CHANNELS
Product MOVIE CHANNEL
Entrant LEO BURNETT DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
1 of 3 Campaign
Type of Entry: Magazine
Type of Entry: Print
Category: PUBLICATIONS & MEDIA
Title: BREAK-FREE PINT CAMPAIGN – ALIEN 3
Product/Service: MOVIE CHANNEL
Entrant Company : LEO BURNETT DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Advertising Agency : LEO BURNETT DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Name Position
Bechara Mouzannar Chief Creative Officer
Peter Bidenko Executive Creative Director
Mohamed Oudaha Creative Director
Jaison Ben Copywriter
Mohammad Aram Art Director
Nadia Bedaywi Advertiser’s Supervisor
Lara El Barkouki/Nicolas Roux Account Manager
Graphic Designer: Ammar Safi Other Credits
English Translation of Main Headlines:
To demonstrate the benefit of ‘break-free’ movies, we printed movie scenes on a double page spread in magazines. We then tore fake promotional ads and attached it in between the movie scenes. These promotional ads were published in magazines that were widely read by movie lovers. Magazines that covered topics such as celebrity gossip, movie reviews, movie listings and fashion tips. The torn ads created curiosity amongst the readers, which helped us demonstrate our message easily.

First published in September 2000

First published in September 2000

Anubis272

Published in Adweek magazine. Vol. XLVIII No. 25. June 18, 2007. Special Report. Page: SR9.

picture-11

First Published in September 2000.

Source: http://www.coloribus.com/admirror/torn_page/

Awraq 2004010

Published in Adweek magazine.Vol. XLVII. No. 25. June 19, 2006. Page:13.

www.adweek.com

picture-22

Bates Pan Gulf does it again; it got shortlisted at the 2008 Dubai Lynx with a copy cat thinking that they would get away with it ;)

Source: http://www.dubailynx.com/winners/print/win_99_1_03069.htm

Type of Entry: Magazine

Category: Drinks

Title: RIPPED

Advertiser/Client: DLUSH

Product/Service: DELUXE BEVERAGES

Entrant Company, City: BPG KUWAIT, Kuwait City

Country: KUWAIT

Advertising Agency, City: BPG KUWAIT, Kuwait City

Country: KUWAIT

Creative Director: Souheil Arabi

Copywriter: Aaron Arthur

Art Director: Radwan Atwi

Account Supervisor: Plamena Koeva

audi_quattro

The Above ad is of an identical idea but with a slightly different execution

AgencyGrey Dubai, UAE
Creative Director: Mounir Harfouche
Art Director: Vipul Salvi
Copywriter: Vipul Salvi
Photographer: Alister Miller
Published: 2007

copycat is a person that mimics or repeats the behavior of another. The term is often derogatory, suggesting a lack of originality. The expression may derive from kittens that learned by imitating the behaviors of their mothers. – Wikipedia.

Plagiarism: The abuse of another’s original work by copying it and passing it off as one’s own. As defined in Alastair Campbell book titled The Designer’s Lexicon. Page: 293 ISBN: 0-304-35505-4.

“Imitation is the sincerest form of thievery” excerpt from a book by Capsule titled Design Matters. Page: 84. ISBN -13:978-1-59253-341-1.

cliché (from French, klɪ’ʃe) is a phrase, expression, or idea that has been overused to the point of losing its intended force or novelty, especially when at some time it was considered distinctively forceful or novel. – Wikipedia.

Related link Torn creativity

5 thoughts on “Leo Burnett tearing out creativity in print media at the Dubai Lynx 2013 with a grand prix with a 13 year old cliche”

  1. Hi there

    I’m of the opinion that a torn page is not an idea in itself, but a visual device which can be used for another 100 years or so long there are trees on earth… as long as every time it’s used, it functions differently. I don’t see the above ad necessarily as an imitation. I have nothing to do with the ad or advertising agency that did it… I still believe it’s a very good campaign.

    Khalid Radwan
    CD

  2. Thank you Khalid for sharing your point of view. But since the idea or the “visual device” has been used many times before in many countries and for many products and services then it lost its novelty and power as it became a cliche. I just do not agree on a cliche from two decades ago to be the winner of the Grand Prix, its just not fair for the other participants. Just for the record we did not participate in this category…I still believe it is a cliche.

  3. John, Thank you for sharing your opinion and continuos visits to the blog. Keep visiting as it is not over till the fat lady sings or till we stop awarding cliches and copycats.

  4. A nice comment worth sharing with you all…

    “Scam ads -Are unethical. It’s fraud. You’re cheating against me, us, your peers. You are basically padding your resume, not very different to using steroids in baseball, falsifying sources in journalism, or faking a test. It’s wrong, plain and simple. -Damages brands. In the digital age, unapproved communications can fly around the internet causing a PR nightmare. This also sets up a ripe opportunity for libel suits. -Lots of awards mean better jobs. Unfortunately, this is true. There are too many egotisical rockstars who’ve gotten those jobs based on faking it, at the expense of the many talented people who haven’t needed to fake it and who do the real work. Yes, there is a role for outlandish ballsy risktakers. But there should not be a role for unprofessional cheaters. -Creates a false sense of talent and ability for agencies. Creativity is one thing. Being able to make it for a real brand is another. An agency that wins tons of awards but who’s real work is less than stellar really is only fooling themselves. Sadly though, they also end up attracting talent who will be disappointed with the real output. Same with the clients who thing that are getting a great agency. If they’re willing to fake their entires, what about timesheets, billings, etc? What’s the line when it comes to professional ethics? -Ruins the process and creative department’s overall credibility. Award shows should celebrate the best work that gets produced. That’s our job. That’s the hard part. If you can’t make a good scam ad with no brief, then frankly, you must suck. If you’ve ever worked with CD who’s built a career on scam, you’ll see how hard it is for them to create great work with real briefs. Talented as they are, they often fail to do what their job is – sell. Creativity and selling go hand in hand in this thing we call advertising, and that should be rewarded. Scam doesn’t ‘raise the bar’ of creativity. It lowers it. And lowers the credibility of the people, agencies and shows who promote it”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>